It’s National Camera Day. When you live in the hometown of George Eastman you know how important cameras are. From taking snapshots with an actual camera and printing them, to making film for movie studios to use, all things photo related are common subjects on the news, in the paper and around the table. George Eastman, also known as “The Father of Photography,” did not invent the camera, but he did invent many additions that improved the use, ease, and production of it, making it widely available   around the world.

Just the other day the DJ’s on my favorite morning radio show were talking about when Fugi Film became available and how a local hid the fact they dared use something other than Kodak film. Kodak was a huge business when I was young. The employees started there right out of high school or college and stayed until they retired. The company was almost a cult in that anyone who worked for them also had most of their family time occupied by activities the company had for them. It was a way of life. Unfortunately technology has changed things. A lot of the buildings are gone, the company is small (in comparison) and often struggling, and the retirees have lost their health care. Sad.

This past Saturday my four-year old granddaughter stood next to me as we looked at pictures of her on my computer. She showed me which ones she liked best and her Mom said, “I haven’t seen these.” Sometimes technology isn’t a good thing. So few people have tangible photos anymore. I think I will get my color printer fired up and print eight pictures a year to make a photo album as a high school graduation gift for each of my grandchildren. I’ll also include pictures of our homes and pets, so in the future they will be able to share their lives with their grandchildren. It will be a way to keep the history of my family alive. And you can bet, I will use Kodak paper to print my photos on, but I will probably take the pictures with my phone. No wonder the day of the home use camera has come and gone.