When an author rereads their own work, one thing they are looking to edit is the use of the same word too many times. Here’s an example by Shaun Kearney, ESL teacher:

It’s a fair bet that if it’s fair tomorrow, then my fair haired wife and I will head to the Spring Fair, which is held in a fair sized park, in this fair city of ours and we may win a prize in a competition if everyone else plays fair.

Rewritten, with the help of a Thesaurus, and some common sense, it would read much better, with less confusion:

It’s a good bet that if the weather is pleasant tomorrow, then my light haired wife and I will head to the Spring Fair, which is held in a large park, in this fine city of ours and we may win a prize in a competition if no one cheats.

Now that’s a really obvious, over-done rendering but now you know what I mean. As an author it’s a good practice to read your own work aloud. The ear will pick up the use of the same word repeatedly when the reading eyes may not, especially if it’s a description of how someone is speaking or appearing.

When working in “Word” the thesaurus button can be a writer’s best friend. I use it a lot when I realize I am describing an argument and everyone is yelling. There are many different ways to say the same thing, “yelling,” if you know enough to look up synonyms and antonyms via the computer’s built-in thesaurus.

I will caution, if you are describing a character that uses the terminology, “Ya know” in between most every phrase they speak, you are sunk. There is no substitute….and it would be as irritating to read it as it is to hear it in person.