Search

Sue Spitulnik

Creative Lady

Category

Technology

Day 4 – Rt. 66 trip

I guess there is anger no matter where you go. We were unwilling listeners to a screaming match outside our hotel window this morning at 6 am. If I had a nickel for every time the F word was used, I could have paid for breakfast. It seemed to be between a boss and employee that work for a pilot/escort car company and Bob heard the employee get fired. We saw three enormous “tubes” come through the area today that were being escorted by what I grew up calling “chase cars.” There is a huge, extends for miles two ways, wind turbine farm off Rt 55 (66’s replacement road) between Odell and Pontiac, IL. We think the tubes are the bases of the windmills.

We used a book called EZ66 Guide for Travelers, 4th edition, to plan our trip. Thank you again, Rhonda, for telling us about it. We also have an Illinois Rt. 66 visitors guide magazine. Both of these aids have interesting stops pinpointed, good restaurants listed, and loads of museums and other 66 memorabilia described so travelers like us don’t miss anything. The guide even shows where the original road still exists and where it doesn’t and what roads to use from Chicago to LA. Our breakfast choice, The Old Log Cabin, was listed in both. We can agree it should be. Shannon was our bubbly, informative, attentive server. I had a potato casserole with my omelet and when Bob asked for a bite, I told him he only got one. Shannon brought us their visitor register book to sign. It was actually a large accounting book and our first introduction to how many people from other countries come to experience Rt. 66. We had no idea it was such a big deal all over the world. We figure about 50% of the travelers are not Americans. Some speak English and some don’t. The accents are interesting to listen to. The Old Log Cabin had a wooden quilt block on the outside of the building and inside there was a whole trail shown if you wanted to go exploring. Shannon gave us printed directions to get into Pontiac proper and two pens advertising the restaurant.

IMG_0915

Great restaurant in Pontiac, IL. Make sure you order the potato casserole.

We went into town and found the Livingston County War Museum. (It’s interesting to see the same names repeated in each county and state. I wonder if it will still be happening by the time we get to the west coast.) This museum was like nothing I had ever experienced. They have over 200 mannequins dressed in military uniform with all the rank and ribbons earned of local deceased vets, and a few really famous ones. It was like standing among live troops. I was in awe. The education director of the museum, David Estes, and I had quite the conversation. I told him about the Rochester Veterans Writing Group I belong to and the anthology project we are working on. He wants to do a Skype session with us and buy some of our books once they are published. It was all I could do to keep my emotions in check while we were there. Each soldier has his/her picture attached to the uniform with information about where he/she served. Soldiers and memorabilia are on display representing WWI to the present. I wish every locale in the US would do this to honor their vets. We also talked to a Vietnam era sub mariner who had come from Chicago with two other Navy vets to donate some of his personal items to the museum. This experience will live long in my memory. We also visited the Rt.66 museum and the Pontiac-Oakland (car) museum.

IMG_0924 (1)

A room full of local veterans and their memorabilia. That’s Audie Murphy on the right in the sand color uniform.

IMG_0926

Lady veterans from the Pontiac, IL area.

IMG_0927

A Vietnam Veteran

IMG_0932

And guys in their BDU’s.

A general observation has been, once we got to Cleveland the license plate holders changed as to which sports-teams they advertise support for. Now we are in Illinois they have changed again. We have spotted 38 different US license plates. Tonight we have to do an inventory to see which ones we are missing. We aren’t paying as close attention now we are just doing short jaunts in the car.

This afternoon we drove north on the old 66 to a town called Odell. There is a 1932 filling station there. The gas pump doesn’t work anymore, but it’s one of those that the gas bubbled up into the top receptacle then was hosed into the car via gravity. They also sold Licks66 homemade ice cream. Bob had strawberry and I had butter pecan. Both were very good. That was lunch.

IMG_0940

1932 gas pump and station in Odell, IL. Bob with our red “baby.”

IMG_0939

The people who visited the station today. Notice all the foreign countries represented. It’s fun to talk to them.

Next we went a bit further north to a town called Dwight. There is a bank there in a building that was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Between the one-way streets and lack of easy to spot signage we couldn’t find it so stopped at the local fire station where some firemen were sitting on their truck out in the sunshine. They gave us more directions we had trouble following. In the end, we found the building. Get this, the back of it was directly across the street from the fire station and there was a big sign stating the fact painted on the side of the building facing the one we were looking for. It gave us a good chuckle and we got to see the beautiful Dwight train station.

IMG_0943.jpg

Dwight Train Station

We had supper at DeLong’s. A local café with good food. The prices here are about two-thirds what we pay in Rochester. I had as good a taco salad as ever and Bob had chicken pot pie which was more like a stew in a bowl with a biscuit. The serving was huge and he had trouble finishing the beef sandwich he ordered thinking the bowl would be a cup.

It’s an earlier night tonight. That’s good. Maybe we will get going in a timelier manner tomorrow.

 

 

Staying in Touch

Are you old enough to remember a time with no computers? When I was a kid we talked with our friends on the telephone, but only if it was a local call. Now I have friends I communicate with more than once a week: in South Africa, Australia, Michigan, Bulgaria, North Dakota, and right here at home in western New York. We all pay a fee to use the internet which connects us as if we were right next door. Learning about how normal every day things are done differently because of global location is fascinating to me. Last week I had a glitch in my computer and I was having a fit about not being able to “talk” to my international friends. I guess I wouldn’t be a good candidate for one of those ‘month in a wilderness cabin for a lot of money promotions.’ Maybe if I could pre-plan it I could make it work, the money sounds good. I digress. Continue reading “Staying in Touch”

Music to Party By

On the day before gathering around the turkey, gather around the nearest jukebox to celebrate National Jukebox Day! The day before Thanksgiving is known as the best drinking day of the year (in my neck of the woods anyway.) Continue reading “Music to Party By”

Space Travel

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon’s surface and collected dirt and rocks to bring back to earth while Michael Collins remained in orbit in the mother ship. If you weren’t alive at the time, think about that for a minute. The event is called,  “…the single greatest technological achievement of all time.” Continue reading “Space Travel”

Print One for Me

It’s National Camera Day. When you live in the hometown of George Eastman you know how important cameras are. From taking snapshots with an actual camera and printing them, to making film for movie studios to use, all things photo related are common subjects on the news, in the paper and around the table. George Eastman, also known as “The Father of Photography,” did not invent the camera, but he did invent many additions that improved the use, ease, and production of it, making it widely available   around the world.

Just the other day the DJ’s on my favorite morning radio show were talking about when Fugi Film became available and how a local hid the fact they dared use something other than Kodak film. Kodak was a huge business when I was young. The employees started there right out of high school or college and stayed until they retired. The company was almost a cult in that anyone who worked for them also had most of their family time occupied by activities the company had for them. It was a way of life. Unfortunately technology has changed things. A lot of the buildings are gone, the company is small (in comparison) and often struggling, and the retirees have lost their health care. Sad.

This past Saturday my four-year old granddaughter stood next to me as we looked at pictures of her on my computer. She showed me which ones she liked best and her Mom said, “I haven’t seen these.” Sometimes technology isn’t a good thing. So few people have tangible photos anymore. I think I will get my color printer fired up and print eight pictures a year to make a photo album as a high school graduation gift for each of my grandchildren. I’ll also include pictures of our homes and pets, so in the future they will be able to share their lives with their grandchildren. It will be a way to keep the history of my family alive. And you can bet, I will use Kodak paper to print my photos on, but I will probably take the pictures with my phone. No wonder the day of the home use camera has come and gone.

Be On Time

It’s National Watch Day. I’ve always been a punctual person. I believe being on time is showing respect to yourself and others when you arrive at a destination, job, party, or whatever in a timely manner. I also feel people that are constantly late have a control problem. They don’t control themselves, thus they do control the others that are waiting for them. Rude!

As a teenager, I can remember going out in the back yard with my girlfriends during the summer sunshine, beach towels, cokes, and a transistor radio in tow. We would take our watches off so as to not get a white wrist band from them while we soaked in the sun. We would check them every so often to make sure we turned over so we didn’t get too much sun all at once on just one side. The watch was always placed under one corner of the towel. I don’t remember our reasoning that it had to be covered.

When cell phones became the in thing, I gave up my watch because I could always “pull out my phone.” Everyone was doing it. I have recently realized that action can be conceived as rude. Yesterday during a talk at a museum, both my husband and step-son pulled out their phones and started looking up baseball and golf scores. I thought it very disrespectful to the speaker, but have to admit, if mine had vibrated, I would have pulled it out too. Our phone addictions might not be so bad if they helped us be on time.

Watches are coming back in style, and can be chosen to show off your own personality. Of course doctors and nurses have always worn them. I know a few people that have recently gotten new watches, because let’s face it, pulling that phone out is not always convenient (especially when driving) and sometimes just plain rude. I think I need to get myself a new watch to wear, especially when in public.

Website Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑