Search

Sue Spitulnik

Flash Fiction and personal thoughts

Tag

fruit

A Healthy Snack

The National Day of Calendar tells me there are over 7,500 varieties of apples and over 7.5% of the world’s production comes from the USA. I have had the good fortune to live in two areas of the states that are known for apple growing; New York state and Washington state. There is nothing like driving past the orchards when the blossoms are out in the spring or when the trees are heavy with fruit. The smell is wonderful and the taste buds react instinctively.  Continue reading “A Healthy Snack”

Eat Real

According to the National Day of Calendar, Food Day aims to help people “Eat Real,” which is defined by them as “cutting back on sugar drinks, overly salted packaged foods and fatty, factory-farmed meats in favor of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and sustainably raised protein.” Continue reading “Eat Real”

Good Anytime

I really like waffles, but the fact I like most foods is no secret. Waffles are a very versatile food. You can have them for breakfast with lots of butter and maple syrup. You can decorate them like the one above and serve sections for dessert at a luncheon or you can have them with chicken fingers for dinner. I haven’t tried the latter one yet, somehow chicken doesn’t go with a waffle in my mind. Continue reading “Good Anytime”

Cold, No Salt

How do you eat your watermelon? There has been quite a lot of discussion on the morning radio show I listen to about whether to eat watermelon with or without salt. Personally I prefer mine cold, no salt. I don’t understand why so many people like to cover the naturally good flavors of so many things by adding salt (like caramels). Continue reading “Cold, No Salt”

Smell Equals Taste

It’s National Strawberry Day. I’m a bit confused why this day falls in February, when strawberries ripen in the summer, but hey, it’s summer someplace. There are “tricks” to buying all sorts of fresh vegetables. The strawberry trick is, if it smells good, it will taste good. Try it next time you are at the grocery store or market.

Have you ever picked fresh strawberries?  The  plants are flush with the ground and one must squat to accomplish the task. When I was a child, it wasn’t so difficult. I wouldn’t even consider it now, as I carry a few extra pounds and have a bad back. We have some wonderful local strawberry farms where you can pick your own. We go when the berries are ripe to have an ice cream sundae, buy berries, and admire the people coming out of the fields with their filled flats and baskets. They always seem to be having a good time.

My grandchildren love strawberries as a snack. If I can find ripe ones, there is a bowl on the table to eat before the main family meal is ready. For my husband, at least one strawberry-rhubarb pie a summer is a requirement. Our only regret is the strawberry picking season doesn’t last long enough.

National Trail Mix Day

Have you gone shopping for trail mix lately?  In the super market I use, Wegmans, there are multiple kinds in the nut section, there are different kinds in the bulk food section and there are yet others in the health food section.  So, I leave the definition of trail mix to you.  I have read the first one made was just peanuts and raisins.

I like to take a bag of trail mix when we go on a car trip.  {It used to be motorcycle trip but the husband’s back gave out, and we have had too many close friends get hurt; I’m actually afraid to get on one now days.} The handy snack satisfies all sorts of cravings.  You can pick out just the chocolate when you need a sweet fix, and you can pick out all the cashews at one time, before anyone else gets to the bag.  The little pieces of dried fruit often give a more sour flavor burst if that is what you desire; and all jumbled together sends the taste buds into happy land, plus puts off the “I have to stop to eat!” demand for a while.  It’s a great staple for in the room too, no refrigeration or heating necessary.

Trail mix was “invented” for just that, eating on the trail when hiking.  I have been on some beautiful trails in my life.  Number one would be on Mt. Rainier in Washington state.  We parked in the Paradise parking lot and my friend pointed UP.  “You see that bench up there?” “Yeah.”  “That’s where we are eating lunch.” “Really?”  I didn’t have the exercise gene back then either, but I made it.  Trail mix was our dessert and the begging jay birds had some too.

Now I am back living in New York state, home territory.  There is a park named Harriet Hollister Spencer State Park that has wonderful views from the trails.  If you didn’t grow up around here, you’ll need a GPS to find it.  We also have Letchworth and Stony Brook state parks, plus many others.  I’m sure you have a great park near you.  Grab a bag of trail mix and go check one out.

One word of caution; dried fruit and chocolate can last almost indefinitely, not so with some types of nuts.  In an open bag in the cupboard they can go rancid.  So buy yourself some fresh trail mix and enjoy the Labor Day Weekend  (If you are in the U.S.)  while eating it, even if you do so in front of the TV, on the golf course, or around a fire pit.

National Cherry Turnover Day

The only thing I can say for sure about cherry turnovers is there is never enough cherries and always too much crust.  I’d rather have a piece of cherry pie with the woven top crust, that way you can see up front, just how many cherries you are getting.  And then of course it’s always better with vanilla ice cream.

When I was a kid there was a great bakery in the town I went to school in.  I’ve mentioned in past posts that we did most of our own baking at home, but things like maple bars, apple fritters, fried cakes, salt rising bread and turnovers were left to the Fitzpatrick family.  I lived in a neighboring town and rode the bus to school so it was a real treat for me to be able to walk home with a classmate and stop at the bakery.  My favorite then, and now, is still the pudding filled, chocolate frosted doughnuts.

Let’s get back to cherries; these are some interesting facts: 

  • Related to plums, peaches and nectarines, cherries are drupes or stone fruits.
  • Cherries were brought to North America in the 1600s by the English colonists.
  • There are more than 1,000 varieties of cherries in the United States.
  • There are an average of 44 cherries in one pound.

Do you know anyone with a cherry tree in their yard?  I’ve known a few people and the complaint is always the same; the birds get the cherries before the human can get out  to pick them.  So that leads me to question how an orchard keeps the birds away long enough to make it worth while to raise them.  I’m sure they have a trick or two, but I don’t know what they are.

In western Ney York state, especially along Lake Ontario, there are orchards that grow cherries, apples, peaches, pears and plums.  The state’s Finger Lakes region is well known for it’s grape vineyards and wineries. Strawberries and red and black raspberries are also plentiful.  To facilitate buying the fresh fruit easily there are public markets in a lot of the local cites, towns and suburbs.  It can be even be a fun family event if you are inclined to go pick your own.  When the fruit is in season, there are bargains and you eat your fill knowing fresh is best.  We wish the seasons lasted a little longer, but then the juicy unadulterated flavors wouldn’t be such a treat.

If you have a favorite cherry turnover memory I would love to hear about it.  And, just in case you are one of my regular readers, yes, I mixed up the chop suey date and cherry turnover date.  Sorry, not as precise as I used to be.  Today is really the 29th.

 

 

 

 

 

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑