Search

Susan Sleggs

Flash Fiction and personal thoughts

Tag

memories

Some “Things” Can’t Be Replaced

“They lost everything in a fire.”

“But they’re all right, right?”

“Depends on how you look at it.”

This could be a conversation between two people discussing any victim of the recent fire that destroyed Paradise, CA, in a quick, intensely hot swoosh. My high school English teacher, her husband and their daughter and son-in-law are some of the victims. Yes, they escaped physically unharmed, but what about emotionally. Imagine the fear and feelings of helplessness they experienced at the time and now they are living in temporary digs wondering how long it will take to rebuild or even if they can. And what about their things, all gone. Things can be replaced, or can they. Continue reading “Some “Things” Can’t Be Replaced”

Who? Me?

Yes, by all means, you! I can hear you thinking, I’m not famous, why would I write my story? I used to think that too until I started blogging. We all have a story to tell and what may seem boring every day happenings to you are not to someone else who lives in another hemisphere. Yesterday I wrote about earmuffs because it was their special day. A friend in South Africa had never heard of them. By sharing our personal information, via blogs or books, we are learning from each other. It makes the puddle we call our life more interesting and larger. Continue reading “Who? Me?”

Thinking of Mom

47 years ago on this date, my mother passed away at home with my father by her side.  She had been sick so long we had started praying for what was best for her instead of asking for her to get better. I was in the upstairs bathroom and could hear my father through the open register to the kitchen below when he called the local funeral home director. It was about five in the morning. He said, “Gene, this is George, I hate to ruin your first day of deer season, but I need you to come pick up my wife.” Continue reading “Thinking of Mom”

Everyone Grieves Differently

Few people like to talk about grief so having an awareness day for it is a good thing. I have had more than my share of personal losses for my age and now as a retiree, the number grows by the year. It’s hard to deal with and accept one of life’s natural progressions at times. The void left when someone close to you dies is all too real. Continue reading “Everyone Grieves Differently”

Print One for Me

It’s National Camera Day. When you live in the hometown of George Eastman you know how important cameras are. From taking snapshots with an actual camera and printing them, to making film for movie studios to use, all things photo related are common subjects on the news, in the paper and around the table. George Eastman, also known as “The Father of Photography,” did not invent the camera, but he did invent many additions that improved the use, ease, and production of it, making it widely available   around the world.

Just the other day the DJ’s on my favorite morning radio show were talking about when Fugi Film became available and how a local hid the fact they dared use something other than Kodak film. Kodak was a huge business when I was young. The employees started there right out of high school or college and stayed until they retired. The company was almost a cult in that anyone who worked for them also had most of their family time occupied by activities the company had for them. It was a way of life. Unfortunately technology has changed things. A lot of the buildings are gone, the company is small (in comparison) and often struggling, and the retirees have lost their health care. Sad.

This past Saturday my four-year old granddaughter stood next to me as we looked at pictures of her on my computer. She showed me which ones she liked best and her Mom said, “I haven’t seen these.” Sometimes technology isn’t a good thing. So few people have tangible photos anymore. I think I will get my color printer fired up and print eight pictures a year to make a photo album as a high school graduation gift for each of my grandchildren. I’ll also include pictures of our homes and pets, so in the future they will be able to share their lives with their grandchildren. It will be a way to keep the history of my family alive. And you can bet, I will use Kodak paper to print my photos on, but I will probably take the pictures with my phone. No wonder the day of the home use camera has come and gone.

Recognition Goes a Long Way

I’m not quite sure why they chose the above picture for Get to Know Your Customers Day.  I would have taken a picture of someone paying for something in a small retail store. Hopefully you have a good memory of a local Mom and Pop store where your parents shopped and the owners called them by name, or you now have a friendly coffee shop where you don’t have to tell the Barista how you want your drink prepared or a bartender that sets up your beer as you walk in the door.

I’m a name nut.  I can’t remember who sings what song, but I can probably tell you all the names of my high school class mates.  Mind you, there were only 72 in my graduating class.  I can even tell you which teachers were my older sister’s favorites.  When my children were dating, they didn’t tell me about a new interest without being able to tell me who she/he was related to in our area because they knew I would ask.  My sisters call to ask about family connections from our original hometown when they can’t remember.

I worked in a quilting fabric store for thirteen years.  I could greet about half of the people that shopped there by first name.  It’s easy for me and I believe it made each customer feel welcome and special.  My boss might tell you I did too much personal talking with them.  I might agree with her, but I bet most of them aren’t greeted that way now that I no longer work there.  In fact, I had another of the employees tell me one day I made the rest of them look bad because I did use first names.  When I think of that comment it makes me sad.

My memory is not just about names.  I hear from friends and family that they enjoy what I share here; I write about people, passions and experiences that have become part of my life, some are pretty old.

The big box stores and on-line shopping have taken personal customer service out of our shopping experiences.  And we all know, getting decent customer service via telephone is often unsatisfactory.  There is an answer.  Shop local, in privately owned stores.  Introduce yourself to the owner and let them know they are meeting your needs.  You’ll be surprised how easy it is to get to know each other’s names.  I promise they will appreciate getting to know their customer.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑