Search

Sue Spitulnik

Flash Fiction and personal thoughts

Tag

NationalDayOf

Pantyhose — Hurray

I am old enough that when I started wearing stockings they were held up with a garter belt. Nothing worse, except maybe a corset, which thankfully I never had to wear. A garter belt was on my dislike list because it often twisted, rode up my back, or showed beneath my skirts. Ugh! When panty hose came out they were a God-send though I can’t say they didn’t run as easily as the pair of stockings. I’m sure with today’s modern technology they could make a pair of stockings that don’t run, but then they wouldn’t sell as many so I doubt that will happen.  Continue reading “Pantyhose — Hurray”

Beauty and Diversity

I had the privilege of living in the Tacoma, Washington area from 1977 to 1991. It was a treat to be able to leave work in the early afternoon and in an hour be in the bustling center of Seattle, or on the coast in Westport, or up on a mountain logging road communing with nature at the base of Mt. Rainier. Add a little more time and you could be driving the Columbia gorge through high dessert in the eastern side of the state smelling apple blossoms (if it was spring). I miss the diversity of its beauty.

People say it rains too much in Washington, but if you look up weather information for western New York State, where I now live, it actually has more grey days than Washington. New York state also has diverse areas that are breathtaking to look at and visit but there is no sight better, to me, than the sun or moon appearing from behind Mt. Rainier. I used to drive to work at dawn and want to pull over just to enjoy the sight.

A few years ago my husband and I traveled to Washington to attend a live recording session of a jazz singer friend of ours, Nancy Kelly. It was November and the “mountain was out,” as the locals say, all three days we were there. Unheard of! I took him for a circular drive over Snoqualmie, Blewett and White Pass and back into Seattle. We experienced sunshine, rain, and blinding snow on that trip in just a few hours. Now he understands how you can have any temperature you want in Washington if you are willing to drive to it.

Seattle’s Public Market is world renowned. You have probably seen a video of the guys throwing big fish back and forth. Seattle is also the original home of Starbuck’s coffee. The first shop was on a side street between the market and the waterfront. You had to know where it was or you would miss it. Now there is a Starbuck’s on most every corner of the U. S.. When I have a cup it brings back memories of going to that first store.

The Army, Air Force and Navy are well represented in Washington. That’s how I ended up there, as an Air Force wife. The wife part didn’t last long, but my memories of living in Washington are vivid and happy. I hope you get to visit there one day and the mountain shows itself for you to gaze at. And, if my novel ever gets published, you’ll find the Washington setting is almost as important as any of the characters.

 

 

 

Thank a Teacher

Do you have a teacher that made a big impact on your life? Is there one teacher you remember over all the others because he/she could help you understand anything?  In my experience most teachers do their job because they love it, not because they are getting paid well to do it, except maybe private tutors. Continue reading “Thank a Teacher”

Birds At My Feeder

It’s national Bird Day. I love my backyard birds. Feeding them isn’t very expensive for the amount of entertainment they provide. I’m always surprised when we have workmen at the house, or sometimes company, and they don’t know the names of our common back yard birds especially the brightly colored ones. I grew up in a family that liked nature so we learned the proper names as soon as we could talk. Continue reading “Birds At My Feeder”

Chocolate Lovers Delight

I was introduced to truffles at the original Dilettante’s Chocolates on Broadway in the Capitol Hill area of Seattle, Washington, in the early ’80’s. The delicacies were the size of a baby’s fist and expensive even then, but worth it. They were so rich and flavorful I would take a tiny bite and let it melt in my mouth before taking the next morsel. The Hungarian recipes were made with only the finest ingredients and you only needed one because it was nice to let the flavor stay in your mouth for a time.  Continue reading “Chocolate Lovers Delight”

Thank a Veteran

Every May 1, across all branches of The United States military, Americans honor the sacrifices of the combat wounded, ill and dying  on Silver Star Service Banner Day.   [courtesy National Day of Calendar]

I’ve been involved with the military a long time and this is a new one on me though the calendar says this day was established in 1917. Maybe I’m not as observant as I think I am. If there is a blue star banner hanging in someone’s window that means they have a family member that is currently in active service to our country, the United States. If there is a similar colored flag with a gold star that means the military member died while  in service to our country. And today I am learning that the silver star banner means the service member came home from combat wounded or ill. Continue reading “Thank a Veteran”

When you move a lot as a military wife, you end up having a lot of different hairdressers. Add on to that, when you have thin baby-fine hair, with just enough wave to be a problem, not an asset, it’s hard to find someone who can cut it so it looks nice when they are done and when you do it yourself. It’s been a long time coming for me to find my gal, Kera. I come home now happy with my cut which is even on both sides, and I style it with little fuss using just a blow dryer and big brush. I’m not a fusser. The sooner I am out of the bathroom, the better. Continue reading

As smartphones have become a constant companion for most people in the United States, landline phones are rapidly losing their relevance. In 2004, more than 90 percent of households in the U.S. had an operational landline phone – now it’s (significantly) less than 50 percent. That’s according to data provided by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, which has been tracking phone ownership in the U.S. as a by-product of its biannual National Health Interview Survey since 2004. Continue reading

Americans have been enjoying this springtime cake since the early 1900s when many cakes were made in cast iron skillets. (The skillet could be put in a wood burning stove oven without harming it.) Continue reading

Since bats was the topic of this weeks 99 word flash fiction at Carrot Ranch Literary I thought I would share the following information with you from the National Day of Calendar.  I happen to like bats, and I hope you will too after reading the following.

April is the best time of the year to observe bats, as they are now beginning to emerge from hibernation. National Bat Appreciation Day is also an excellent time to learn about the role bats play in nature. One important reason to celebrate bats is that they are considered to be an “insectivorous” creature because they rid our world of many annoying insects.  In one hour, a bat can eat up to 1,000 mosquitoes. Continue reading

A Family Matter

Healthcare decisions for yourself and others you may have to make choices for are better done before anyone gets sick. I recommend having a straight talk with your spouse and children, or parents, or whomever you want to know what you want and don’t want done when the time comes. Talking about these matters when you are of sound mind, and not in pain, will make the discussion easier on everyone.  Continue reading “A Family Matter”

Can You Spell

Today is National Scrabble Day. I have a pretty good handle on the American language and most of the time can spell a word correctly, but winning at Scrabble has never been one of my strong suits. Continue reading “Can You Spell”

Website Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑